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Author Topic: Notes on Development  (Read 7016 times)

Offline indiamikezulu

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Notes on Development
« on: February 25, 2017, 07:13:38 am »
Note One:

If you belong to the community of a 1.0 crypto, you must understand that ignoring the 2.0s – talking nonsense like ‘ICOs always eventually go to zero!’ – is just not going to work. 95% of all cryptos are dead or dying today; and the 2.0s are clustering at the top of the charts.

[Groestl is a pretty complex ‘1.0’. Perhaps we could label it a ‘1.5’? ]

We need to evaluate ourselves. For example, the communities of the ‘dark’ coins, like XMR and Bytecoin, are unfriendly. The assumption is that, if you don’t have the technical skills to work with these complex instruments (I don’t . . . ), the community couldn’t care less. So, a 2.0 = potential ‘currency function’ + some technical feature(s).

How can we compete with them? Firstly, we note how very solid GRS’s ‘base’ seems: it has fine daily volume, and its price is not dwindling – and at three years old, it’s established.

And before we go further, let’s note that I expect an enormous amount of capital will flow into cryptos when the GFC really begins to roll – perhaps tens and tens of billions.
So, we concentrate on ‘currency function.’ That should include developing a merchant network.

Now, the project(s) we run can be tiny. We just need to prove that we can do it, and we’ll gain experience by doing it.*

Conclusion: to survive, a crypto must advance from the immature ‘speculative-trading’ phase to the mature ‘currency function’ phase.

Note Two next week.

*IndiaMikeZulu has been devving on cryptos non-stop since late 2013. We’ve had the awful experience of having one after another ‘go down’ under us – because we stayed with the communities because we wanted to understand how communities work, and not just make a buck and bolt. We’ve learned an enormous amount.

Offline indiamikezulu

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Re: Notes on Development
« Reply #1 on: February 26, 2017, 12:51:32 pm »
Note Two

Meanwhile, a new phase has cropped up between just-speculative-trading and ordinary-folks-using-cryptos-as-ordinary-money. It is a response to the deterioration of fiat currencies. The idea of the Winklevosses’s ETF is an example of this ‘Wall-Street HODLing,’ this ‘Chinese-Elite HODLing.’
That is, people who aren’t citizens of Planet Krypto are buying cryptos, but they are HODLing them rather than using them as money.

So, there’s lots to discuss about whom we might approach to adopt Groestl.



Note Three

Here’s a first draft of What Are The Various Hurdles to Crypto Adoption?

Introduction: Important Note: if you have limited human and financial resources, you must allocate those resources very very carefully. It’s much better – I think – to have one tiny tiny project advancing well than to have a number that are not advancing well.


A: the technical hurdle: computer folk scored an historical bull’s eye with the Internet because people had to use it, so geeks could arrogantly refuse to provide quality technical assistance.

But people don’t have to use cryptographic currencies; so if we are serious about getting a million new Groestl Coin wallets set up in the next decade, we must focus on providing good simple instructions, and on-going technical assistance. Of course, every community talks about this; but the reality is that it’s 99.9% just talk.


B: ‘political’/everyone-is-crazy-busy: governments and banks did a thorough job in 2013-14 of giving cryptos a bad name; and anyway, trying to simply explain cryptos to someone who has never heard of cryptos is a difficult task.

And everyone in the western world is already insanely busy.

Therefore, people may think cryptos are cool, but that just not the same as adopting them. There’s a lot of work to do here, figuring out whom we should approach to adopt, and how we should approach those folks.

One thing is worth noting: crypto adoption is roughly split between ‘functional’ and ‘political.’ Certain businesses – Kaspersky comes to mind – have every reason in the world to adopt crypto-currencies. This is a business use-case; and for these adopters, a crypto is a payment method pure and simple, and such adopters want cryptos to be embedded in the existing banking-system. These folks are pro-regulatory.

On the other hand, the political guys – libertarians like me – hope that cryptos will bring the banking system to its knees.
So, if you are going to explain cryptos to a prospective adopter, figure out first why they want to adopt cryptos.


C: regulations: what’s clear in Australia, and I suppose much of the world, is that GoverBank nods its head wisely about how good and necessary cryptos/blockchains are; but makes sure that the regulatory environment is so uncertain that businesses are simply afraid to try cryptos. Now, we can’t change the laws; but we can learn what basic information people need to have.

[I have been ridiculed for the suggestion that crypto communities have ‘national chapters’ – ‘We’re all pseudonymous! And the Internet makes the world one big village!’

Rubbish!

In every community it would be helpful if the members knew who else was working in that same country (whether the members are pseudonymous or not. I’m public.). Why? Because every country has different conditions and regulations.]


D: one of the odd things we’ve learned, readers, is how insanely anti-crypto bullion lovers are. I do understand their basic argument. May I suggest that crypto-bullion trades should be a fundamental activity in communities? Of course, it’s P2P; but us IndiaMikeZulu guys are enthusiastic about P2P.
Note that there’s a lot to learn about the regulations – in each country -- regarding buying and mailing physical bullion.

Could we have a ‘ticker’ that show the GRS-silver price?



E: The Big OPSEC Picture: security for everyday Internet use is becoming more and more difficult. So, us crypto geeks could offer ordinary folks and small businesses a ‘package’ of basic Internet security with a Groestl Coin wallet ‘embedded’ in the package.

Think for a moment about your OPSEC. Do you have things like the password on your laptop and the recovery details of your email as part of the same back-up system that you use to secure 2FAs and passwords? I bet you do!

Offline indiamikezulu

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Re: Notes on Development
« Reply #2 on: August 09, 2017, 01:21:35 am »
Setting up Wallets

A teenager who lives in the town near me is learning to trade GRS. Lonely Highway Delivery Guy and I are helping him.

And in recent days, I have cruised some old POW crypto communities, to test a theory. Here's what I found:

four different cryptos -- I won't name them -- all have issues with wallets. And it's also assumed that newcomers can compile wallets from conf files. (Did I get that right -- 'conf file'?) For one of these cryptos, I personally tried to set up both the Windows 64-bit wallet and the android. Couldn't do it.

Then I had a go at the GRS wallets. Bingo! Tried three, and they all worked -- 'click-n-go'!! Then the teenager we're teaching to trade tried -- Bingo! Click-n-go.

Conclusion: it may be the case that the original hard-core community members are all talented enough to compile wallets -- they're all miners: these are POW cryptos. And it is the case that recent inflows of capital have greatly increased the value of those cryptos -- rescued them, if you will. But the fact remains that these communities are shrinking in size, and the lack of click-n-go wallets is the pivotal issue. So GRS's approach makes more and more sense to me. Well done, you devs!!

Offline jackielove4u

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Re: Notes on Development
« Reply #3 on: August 09, 2017, 07:15:45 pm »
Thank you Mark!
Yes our approach will be rewarded in the end, we want to have the basis right first which have a working wallet. No fancy conf file or bootstrap file needed.
Make it so easy that your grandmother and granddaughter can download and install it without any explanation. We hate the addnode in the conf solution other coins provide, it doesnt look professional.

Offline indiamikezulu

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Re: Notes on Development
« Reply #4 on: September 08, 2017, 09:41:08 am »
https://cointelegraph.com/news/fintech-companies-disrupting-finance-creating-bank-of-tomorrow

Once again, I’ll try to explain The Thing That Keeps Getting Me in Trouble:

Let’s choose as our examples two cryptos of very different types: Ether and GRS. I hold swags of both. I like both. But I think there is a lack of discussion about the correct development models for both.

One is ‘integrationist,’ and the article outlines clearly how that works, the crypto in question becomes embedded.

The other is more so a ‘pure currency-function’ instrument; and I came to work in the GRS community specifically because (a) cryptos like GRS are what I think of as ‘real’ cryptos – certainly in their political potential to function without much attachment to the legacy banking-system – and (b) the GRS dev team is doing an almost perfect job of developing GRS for currency function.

There is nothing conspiratorial here at all*. Just the observation that a ‘grass roots’ approach suits us best: we should manage some international meet-ups in the next couple of years. We should be oriented to developing HODL-ing/trading/educational networks in our home communities.

[Early next year, I will approach the guys at Tux exchange, to ask them about the theoretical notion of a trading-pair that trades GRS only in) blocks of 10,000 – OTC should be second nature to a crypto of GRS’s type.]

*What seems to upset folks – and the crazy history of cryptos makes it a reasonable suspicion – is that anywhere where members of a community co-operate at all, then the intent must be dishonest.